This Boston Artist-In-Residence wants to bring more street art to the city | Boston.com

Boston artist Sneha “Imagine” Shrestha said she believes this is the “golden age” of street art.

“Street art is riding this wave right now,” she said. “There’s no better time to bring it to Boston.”

The 30-year-old Nepalese native is one of seven Boston-area artists recently selected for AIR, Boston’s artist-in-residence program. AIR, which is in its third year, encourages artists to explore the ways in which “socially engaged art processes can be used to bolster city initiatives,” according to the City of Boston’s website.

 

Source: https://www.boston.com/culture/arts/2018/0...

Julia Child’s Roast Chicken Fixed My Broken Heart | Kitchn

Vadim rolled his own cigarettes. He had broad shoulders, six-pack abs, and a chest tattoo that read "Rock & Roll." He was the lead singer in a rockabilly band and had a hot rod he planned to fix up. I met him when I took a part-time job as a cashier at Savenor's Market, a specialty foods shop in Cambridge, Massachusetts, where he was the head butcher.

Yeah, butcher. Hot, right?

 

Source: https://www.thekitchn.com/julia-child-s-ro...

Read This Is The Year We Do Better on ChefsFeed

OVER THE PAST SEVERAL MONTHS, OUR WORLD HAS BEGUN TO CONSIDER THE IDEA THAT THERE IS NO SINISTER GENE.

We have been confronted with the reality that bad men often masquerade as good men, that even the most powerful can fall prey to assault, and that we have failed deeply, for generations, to protect some of our most vulnerable citizens. We understand now that abusers are all around us.   Over the past several weeks, revelations about some of the restaurant industry’s most beloved, successful personas have forced us to face an even more terrifying reality: These bad men are not just all around us. They are us.

I knew that already. So did millions of my fellow abuse and assault survivors. Millions. And yet, somehow, we are shocked. If one in every five women in America will experience sexual assault in her lifetime, how do we reconcile our astonishment?

 

Source: https://www.chefsfeed.com/stories/842-this...

Read Water for Chefs—David McMillan, Joe Beef on ChefsFeed

Chef David McMillan needs no introduction, but let's give him one anyway. Joe Beef, Liverpool House, Le Vin Papillon. Foie gras, ice fishing, all of the offal. Taxidermy, tattoos, whole pig heads. Oysters. Burgundy. Game fowl. Cheese for days. Deep Québécois pride.  

This guy. This guy is everyone’s Chef. Lucky for us, this guy also loves wine. This guy loves love. “Drink healthy beverages made from grapes,” he says. “Eat clean. Love everyone. Be a good person. Fight pedigree and pretense. We love you." 

 

Source: https://www.chefsfeed.com/stories/477-wate...

Read A Conversation with Chef Barbara Motherflippin' Lynch on ChefsFeed

LET ME JUST SAY THIS: BARBARA LYNCH IS ALL OF US.  

She’s a wanderer. Curious, insecure, impatient for something beyond her own demonstrated power. Despite four James Beard Awards, a Relais & Chateaux grand chef nod, and positions at the top of every “Best Of” list from nearly every industry rag—and, revealed just before press time, TIME's 100 Most Influential People in the World—she’s somehow confidently uncertain of herself (but exceedingly confident of others). She’s a true New Englander, sarcasm guarding her wary heart. She trusts and gets burned. She worries about being a good mother.  

It’s all in her new memoir, Out of Line: A Life of Playing with Fire, released this month. Along with well-worn narratives about her hard-knock Southie upbringing, the book carries revelations regarding the world-famous chef’s struggles with childhood trauma, self-doubt, and sexual identity. It exposes the cracks in a Boston restaurant empire, and it does it honestly. This isn’t a shrine to success, but the chronicle of one very unusual, restless life. It’s a good read, plain and simple.  

At the Cherry Bombe Jubilee conference a few days before the book’s release, Chef Lynch gave her life story yet another plot twist: an announcement that she’ll be giving her restaurants to her employees, focusing instead on a bank for women. I sat down with her a few days later to see if I could get some answers from a woman who seems to thrive on keeping us all guessing.  

 

Source: https://www.chefsfeed.com/stories/625-a-co...

Read The Prodigal Son on ChefsFeed

EVAN LEWANDOWSKI IS A REALLY LIKABLE GUY MAKING REALLY LIKABLE WINE.  

He hails from Wichita, Kansas. He’s in his early thirties. He’s what most would call religious, but he uses the word "spiritual." He resides in Salt Lake City, Utah, where he moved to attend the University of Utah in 2001, not so much to go to college, but to ski. He probably wouldn’t have ended up in Utah if the Winter Olympics hadn’t been scheduled there for 2002, alerting his high school guidance counselor to the city’s existence. He applied and was accepted without even visiting the campus.  

Fifteen years after college, he’s still in Utah, making wine in a tiny urban winery. He estimates that 99.2% of the wine he produces is made from grapes he harvests in California. After every harvest, he leads a small caravan containing the pressed juice and grapes across Nevada back to Salt Lake City to finish. Despite this, he won’t move to California to make wine. This is strictly because he loves Utah so much. If all goes accordingly, he’ll plant his own vineyard there in the spring of 2017. He has big plans for Utah wine.  

The name of Evan’s winery project is Ruth Lewandowski Wines.  

Ruth Lewandowski doesn’t exist.  

 

Source: https://www.chefsfeed.com/stories/493-the-...

Privateer Rum and Maggie Campbell's Rise to Distilling Stardom - Thrillist

Source: https://www.thrillist.com/drink/boston/pri...